Category: Write

Contracts that perform in practice

Contracts are tools to help you do business. Your contract must perform for you on your projects – it should be easy to use and responsive to your and your clients’/suppliers’ business needs. Practical processes We could spend a long time debating which are the most critical terms in a

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Trust-enhancing terms

As well as having a positive process, the terms in your contract can (and should) enhance the trust you already have* with your client/supplier, both through specific terms and through their general style and tone. Demonstrating trust First, check which of the 8 Habits of Defective Contracts you are guilty

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Administering playbook contracts

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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The playbook and standards

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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Trust – does your contract show it?

The length (and contents) of your contract gives off so many first impressions to would-be clients. A contract that’s just a couple of emails risks not covering the bare minimum, and a long contract with in-depth legal stipulations may showcase a lack of trust. So what is the ‘Goldilocks measure’

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Scope – what won’t you do?

In an average contract, you’ll see suppliers describe in detail exactly what they will do as part of the scope of works. But in a great contract, you’ll see suppliers describe what they won’t do. In this post, I focus on the importance of adding clarity to your contract to

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Traps in T&C

There’s a certain honesty in this tick box: From a UX perspective, the lack of a link to the terms and conditions is an own goal – ironically, the page was part of the voting form for the Women in Legal Tech awards. According to research (New York Times) less

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Design life: duty or desire?

Any construction project (or product) can be stated to have a specific design life – normally listed in calendar years. Recent cases have reviewed if a design life is a promise ie an actionably duty or a mere statement of intent or desire: sinking wind turbines: a requirement for these

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Contractions in contracts

I was chatting to Jeremy who havd reviewed one of my template contracts. He was fine with its content but said he would be even less formal in his contract/proposal; in particular he would use contractions. So where I had written I will he would use I’ll. I didn’t disagree

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Punishing wordiness

Was it the cost that bothered the judge or the wordiness? In a case dating back to 1595, the court punished a claimant who did ‘draw, devise and engross’ paperwork which amounted to six score sheets of paper, or 120 pages. The court’s view was that it could have been

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