Category: Write

Contracts need clarity

What happens when your contract lacks clarity? How will the English courts interpret it? In Mott MacDonald v Trant Engineering, the judge reminded contract writers and users of these principles by which they work out what your contract words actually mean: if the words are not ambiguous, then the courts

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Is it obvious? It is necessary?

Any contract – whatever its subject, however long it is, whether paper-based, digital or verbal – can have terms added to by either legislation, custom or by case law. These additions are called implied terms. This post summarises a recent Court of Appeal decision which clarified when/how the courts can

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Easy to access and understand?

In a recent claim for nearly £1.8m against an online betting company, the judge held that none of these features are… at first blush features of an open and fair consumer contract that is easy to access and understand. On the basis it is easier to learn from the mistakes

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What does your clause mean?

What your contract means is essentially decided by strangers. What you personally think is utterly irrelevant because of the importance of an objective view. What previous cases have said about an individual term or clause is also largely irrelevant because of the importance of context. Interpreting your contract When deciding

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Contracts that perform in practice

Contracts are tools to help you do business. Your contract must perform for you on your projects – it should be easy to use and responsive to your and your clients’/suppliers’ business needs. Practical processes We could spend a long time debating which are the most critical terms in a

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Trust-enhancing terms

As well as having a positive process, the terms in your contract can (and should) enhance the trust you already have* with your client/supplier, both through specific terms and through their general style and tone. Demonstrating trust First, check which of the 8 Habits of Defective Contracts you are guilty

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Administering playbook contracts

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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The playbook and standards

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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Trust – does your contract show it?

The length (and contents) of your contract gives off so many first impressions to would-be clients. A contract that’s just a couple of emails risks not covering the bare minimum, and a long contract with in-depth legal stipulations may showcase a lack of trust. So what is the ‘Goldilocks measure’

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Scope – what won’t you do?

In an average contract, you’ll see suppliers describe in detail exactly what they will do as part of the scope of works. But in a great contract, you’ll see suppliers describe what they won’t do. In this post, I focus on the importance of adding clarity to your contract to

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