Category: Scope

Review Your Scope: Is It Included?

To work out whether works, goods or services are ‘extra’ ie a change to the original scope, you need to know the original scope of the works as well as how your contract defines changes/variations/extras. However, the definition of a change varies from pretty wide (eg JCT), to narrow (MF/1)

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How Flexible Should Your Scope Be?

According to the NBS Contracts and Law Survey 2018, scope creep disrupted projects more than any other factor:                           Variations were also the main cause of 42% of disputes. So what can we do about scope creep? Are

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Lessons from Failure: Check the Technical Data

I would like you to (1) learn from the failures of others (the quickest, cheapest and least painful approach) and (2) embrace the idea that failure is not optional – it is your best friend. Lesson: check the technical data In November 1999, NASA lost a $125m satellite, the Mars

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No Written Contract? No Problem

A US$60m project for a luxury Caribbean resort came to a sorry end for many hundreds of disgruntled customers. Even if your project does not involve cabanas, windswept beaches or multi-million pound deals, you can learn from the lessons of Harlequin and its contractor. Setting the scene The ‘startling features’

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Quality: Fit for What Purpose?

Fitness for purpose is a phrase much debated and bandied about. But what does it really mean? What your contract needs If you want your contract to provide a project which is ‘fit for purpose’ you need three things: a contractor responsible for both design and construction (either D&B or

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Your Contract’s Hidden Terms: Implied By Cases

However well-drafted your contract is, there are some terms you cannot avoid and which may be added into your contract. Implied terms can be added to your contract, without your knowledge. They can arise from custom, be imposed by statute, or from decisions of the courts (known as case law),

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Review Your Contract: Scope

The first element in my STAR analysis is Scope. When reviewing a contract, it is critical that the obligations of both partners are clearly set out. Often the provider – the company providing the goods, materials, and plant or carrying out the works or performing the services – gets all

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