Category: TLC

Contracts need clarity

What happens when your contract lacks clarity? How will the English courts interpret it? In Mott MacDonald v Trant Engineering, the judge reminded contract writers and users of these principles by which they work out what your contract words actually mean: if the words are not ambiguous, then the courts

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Preparing for the march of technology

Are you ready for digital first contracting? My survey seeks to find out broad opinions on current practices in contracting, and what the future may hold. It’s great to get a real-world view from across sectors and continents. However, low confidence in your organisation’s ability to manage the march of

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Will machines jeopardise your working relationships?

My sneak peak at the responses so far to the 500words digital-first contracting survey shows some interesting trends on how current practices in contracting vary and how they might change in the future. So how might changes to the business landscape impact construction contracting? Will contracts embrace the rise of

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Administering playbook contracts

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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The playbook and collaboration

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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The playbook and modular

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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The playbook and digital

The UK Government’s Construction Playbook has 14 key policies for reforming and modernising aspects of public sector projects (and perhaps, with luck and trickle down, the private sector too). However, it will need some robust contract tools to bring those ideas to fruition. In a series of posts, I consider

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WFH: the rise of virtual signatures

The technology to allow parties to a contract to sign, execute, witness and complete contracts without leaving their home office is not new. However, with nearly 50% of the UK working from home, the time for electronic or digital signatures is ripe. Rather than considering the relative merits of the

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Contractions in contracts

I was chatting to Jeremy who havd reviewed one of my template contracts. He was fine with its content but said he would be even less formal in his contract/proposal; in particular he would use contractions. So where I had written I will he would use I’ll. I didn’t disagree

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Trust and the wrong tone

Dominic Cummings, a UK Government advisor, was outed for an ill-conceived trip to Barnard Castle during the Spring 2020 lockdown (a place which ought to be famous for its mechanical silver swan rather than policital shenanigans). In his statement, he made a series of increasingly bizarre claims about testing his

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