Category: TLC

Simplify Your Contract Strategy

The organisation Clarity is brimming with lovely lawyers and legal consultants fascinated by how we can simplify legal documents and overcome the barriers to changing traditional drafting. After a recent meeting, Cathy Wilcox introduced me to the Pathclearer project, and its developer – Steve Weatherley then Head of Legal at

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Shall Must or Will

Much has been written about the words that contract writers should adopt to portray an obligation. Is it shall, must or will? Here’s a summary of the expert views: Ken Adams proposes a disciplined use of shall (banishing shall from business contracts) with must and will for non-party obligations or

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Accuracy, Brevity and Clarity

The rule for simplicity [read more] is neatly espoused by Joseph Pulitzer: Put it to them briefly so they will read it, clearly so they will appreciate it, picturesquely so they will remember it and, above all, accurately so they will be guided by its light As a lawyer and

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Clear Communication

Clear communication means that users can understand what they have to do, when they have to do it, and change their behaviour accordingly. What should you do? If you want to remove the padding in your communication or in your contracts then you should: work out who your reader, audience

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Negotiating for Win-Win

Negotiation tactics commonly used in the construction industry are a mix of psychological manoeuvres to get the best deal, ploys designed to change the other’s perception of their power and game plays that pressurise you to reduce your expectations. In this post, Derek Arden, author of Win-Win, How to Get

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EQ in Contracts

EQ is a measure of a person’s emotional intelligence. How many contracts make any reference to the need for a good standard of EQ? None? Interestingly some of the key skills for emotional intelligence in business, as mentioned in Dr Lynda Shaw’s book ‘Your Brain is Boss‘ are directly relevant

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The blame game

Dy Lynda Shaw in her book Your Brain is Boss says: So often we do not see or hear accurately what someone is trying to communicate, because we get the gist and fill in the gaps according to our own experience and perception so far. You may recognise some of

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Fool-proof contracts

Good advice when creating contracts: You can draft a contract with the aim of making it either fool-proof (by drafting it in simple terms) or rogue-proof (by drafting complex, detailed terms), but not both This comes from a speech from Max Abrahamson, whose principles of risk management in construction contracts

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Avoid Ambiguities at All Costs

The UK Supreme Court have recently revisited the thorny issue of fitness for purpose (and millions of Euros depend on the answer). How can you avoid the embarrassment of publication riches afforded by a Supreme Court decision, as well as months in court (the decision was given 8 years after

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Serendipitous Simplicity

Simplicity means is best described using this definition of plain language A communication is in plain language if its wording, structure, and design are so clear that the intended audience can easily find what they need, understand what they find, and use that information. Source: International Plain Language Federation So

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