Category: Write

Your Contract’s Tone of Voice

Some companies think hard about making their websites, guides, and blogs user-friendly and easy to read. But they rarely follow this tone of voice into their contracts. Think about it: until your prospective customer has agreed to your contract, they are still a prospect. That means you are still woo-ing

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Remedies for Late Payment

You can use your contract to describe what you want to happen if something happens which is outside the original contract: you can include delay damages if the provider is late you can include a mechanism to change the scope if the client changes her mind you can include a

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Certain Terms in Your Contract

When writing your contract, you should create clauses which are certain. It is one of the five essential elements for a binding contract (see What You Need). The courts will not enforce  a clause or term if they cannot be sure what it means. Limiting Your Liability In Trebor v

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Be Open

In researching terms and conditions, I came across a Report from the Office of Fair Trading (2011) on Consumer Contracts. The Report recommends that consumer contracts are written to be open, welcoming and fair. The same applies to B2B contracts. Be open The Report defines open contracts as ones where:

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Don’t Use Three Words When One Will Do

Many disclaimers (found in terms & conditions and small print) contain far too many words and are jam-packed with technical legal terms. This one is typical but comes from the GOV.UK website. These are well-written and surprisingly readable T&C. Guarantees, conditions or warranties The disclaimer starts by stating that the site

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Say No To Jargon

Whether you are a lawyer, business owner or consultant, there are three temptations when writing a contract. They are: Temptation 1: using jargon and/or legalese Temptation 2: stealing with pride Temptation 3: writing a new deal Let’s start with temptation 1, typified by using jargon or phrases which you don’t

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Complete Your Contract

Now for some magic! This post is about invisible clauses. Implied Terms If your contract does not have enough terms to be workable, clauses can be added (implied) to make it work properly. They can be added as a result of: Custom [read more] Laws or statutes [read more] Cases

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No-one Needs Legalese

According to this Thomson Reuter’s Blog Legalese is “a colloquial term describing the body of formal and technical legal language that is difficult or impossible for laypeople to understand.” It is ridiculously common but can you avoid it when writing your contract? No-one needs legalese In this introduction to a

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Create Confidence with Plain Language

This blog was prompted by a tweet from plain language specialist Cheryl Stephens. She was reviewing a UK Act of Parliament or law. ‘Cease to have effect on’ Many Acts of Parliament use a particular phrase to state when an Act, right or permission ends. This extract comes from The

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Don’t Copy & Paste

When you’ve just set up your business, you don’t often have the money to spend on the ‘luxury’ of a lawyer to write your contract for you. However, what you really shouldn’t do is blindly copy terms off friends, clients, suppliers, the internet or from the back of a holiday

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